Cognitive health can benefit from balanced mealtimes

Summary: Breakfast may very well be the most important meal of the day, especially when it comes to maintaining good cognitive health. Scientists have found that skipping breakfast increases the risk of cognitive decline in middle and old age, and that keeping your energy intake distributed temporarily throughout the day helps maintain cognitive health.

Source: Press about higher education

About 55 million people worldwide suffer from dementia, and the incidence of the disease is steadily increasing. The population is expected to triple by 2050, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Not only does dementia affect the quality of life of individuals, it also places a significant economic burden on families and society.

Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between the time distribution of daily energy intake (TPEI) and the risk of various chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. However, there is relatively little evidence regarding the relationship between TPEI and cognition at the population level.

Previous studies in animal models have shown that disruptions to mealtimes can alter the rhythm of the hippocampus clock, thereby affecting cognition.

According to a short-term intervention study of 96 young adults, dividing equal amounts of food into four meals between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. may improve cognitive function compared to eating twice between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. However, long-term research into TPEI and cognition is lacking.

Recently, Dr. Changzheng Yuan and Dongmei Yu of Zhejiang University published an article in: Life metabolism titled “Temporal patterns of energy consumption and cognition and their decline: a community-based cohort study in China.”

Based on the public database of the China Nutrition Health Survery (CHNS), a total of 3,342 middle-aged and older adults (mean age 62) from nine provinces in China with a starting age of ≥ 55 years were enrolled in the study.

Researchers used: 1) A data-driven k-means algorithm to identify six TPEI patterns, including the “evenly distributed” pattern, the “breakfast dominant” pattern, the “lunch dominant” pattern, the dinner dominant pattern, the “snack-rich” pattern “And the” skipping breakfast “formula;

The result showed that compared to those with the “evenly distributed” pattern, the long-term cognitive scores were significantly lower in those who had an imbalanced TPEI, especially those with the “skipping breakfast” pattern. The image is in the public domain

2) Cognitive function was assessed by a modified cognitive state telephone interview (TICS-m) including immediate and delayed word recall (20 points), counting backwards (2 points) and serial-7 subtraction test (5 points). The total global cognitive score ranged from 0 to 27, with a higher score indicating better cognitive function;

3) The correlation of TPEI with cognitive function over 10 years was assessed using linear mixed models (LMM) that were adjusted for age, gender, residence, total energy, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, household income, education level , and body mass index (BMI).

The result showed that compared to those with the “evenly distributed” pattern, the long-term cognitive scores were significantly lower in those who had an imbalanced TPEI, especially those with the “skipping breakfast” pattern.

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Thus, maintaining a balanced TPEI has a potentially positive effect on cognitive health, while skipping breakfast can significantly increase the risk of cognitive decline in middle-aged and elderly people. Overall, this study highlights the importance of optimal TPEIs in cognitive function.

About this diet and news from cognitive research

Author: Shuqin He
Source: Press about higher education
Contact: Shuqin He – Higher Educational Press
Image: The image is in the public domain

Original research: Open Access.
“Temporal patterns of energy and cognition intake and decline: a community-based cohort study in China,” by Changzheng Yuan et al. Life metabolism


Abstract

Temporal patterns of energy and cognitive intake and decay: a community-based cohort study in China

Globally, some 55 million people suffered from widespread dementia in 2019, which is expected to triple by 2050, especially in low and middle-income countries. More and more attention has been paid to the nutritional factors.

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